3 Arguments Against IVF: Artificial Reproduction Is Not Procreation

christian_new.jpgWASHINGTON, D.C., APRIL 6, 2011 (Zenit.org ).- Here is a question on bioethics asked by a ZENIT reader and answered by the fellows of the Culture of Life Foundation.

Q: The Catholic Church teaches that in vitro fertilization (IVF) is always wrong. I understand this to be the case when embryos are made and destroyed. But my doctor said that IVF could be used in a way that wouldn’t create and destroy "extra" embryos, even though it would lower our chances for a successful pregnancy. If this is true, why is IVF wrong when used by husbands and wives? K.M. — Denver, Colorado

E. Christian Brugger offers the following response:

A: The question rightly identifies the wrongness of creating and destroying (and we should add freezing) human embryos in and through the process of IVF. But even if IVF was chosen only by married couples, and those couples intended to create only as many embryos as they implant, and they rejected the eugenic screening and destruction of disabled embryos, IVF still would be gravely wrong.

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Human Fathers and Their Sublime Task and Mission…

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Introduction
We have seen already that human husbands and fathers have the sublime mission and honor of “revealing and reliving on earth the very fatherhood of God” (see St. Paul, Ephesians 3:15 and Pope John Paul II, Familiaris Consortio, no. 25).  John Paul II continues by identifying  the principal things a father should do in performing “this task.” He will do so “by exercising generous responsibility for the life conceived under the heart of the mother, by a more solicitous commitment to education, a task he shares with his wife (cf. Gaudium et spes, 52), by work which is never a cause of division in the family but promotes its unity and stability, and by means of the witness he gives of an adult Christian life which effectively introduces the children into the living experience of Christ and the Church.”

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PREPARATION FOR MARRIAGE III: IMMEDIATE PREPARATION TWO: A Chaste Courtship

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Introduction
If the marriage for which engaged couples are preparing is to be happy and lasting, their courtship must be a chaste one. Abundant evidence shows that living together and having sex prior to marriage is not advisable if one wants a happy, lasting marriage because after marriage there is frequent divorce, infidelity, and unhappiness. Thus this article focuses on the meaning of love because a chaste courtship must be rooted in a proper understanding of love.

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PREPARATION FOR MARRIAGE III: IMMEDIATE PREPARATION PART ONE: Considerations Prior to Becoming…

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Introduction
Pope John Paul II believes that the immediate preparation for marriage should take place “in the months and weeks immediately preceding the wedding” (Familiaris Consortio 78). [1] It is a period during which an engaged couple should, with the help of others and in particular their own religious communities, deepen their understanding of and commitment to marriage as a reality whose author is God, between one man and one woman, whose one-flesh union in the conjugal act ought to be open to the goods of exclusive conjugal love and children. 

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PREPARATION FOR MARRIAGE II: PROXIMATE PREPARATION: A Stable Job, Adequate Financial Resources…

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Introduction

In its document, Preparation for the Sacrament of Marriage, no. 32, the Pontifical Council for the Family wrote: “Proximate preparation takes place during the period of engagement. It consists of specific courses and must be distinguished from immediate preparation.”   Unfortunately, because I misread what John Paul II had to say about “immediate preparation” in Familiaris Consortio 66, I had considered the engagement period to be part of the ”immediate preparation” for marriage. Thus, the two earlier essays in this series on the “proximate preparation for marriage” should in fact have been included as part of the “remote preparation for marriage.” I apologize for my error. This is the first piece of three on “proximate preparation.” A final essay will focus on “immediate preparation.”

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